Break The Frame

09:18

By Sophie Huckfield

The moving image work: Break The Frame, incorporates contemporary and traditional craft processes: from hacking open source technology, puppetry, poetry, a musical score, stop motion and moving image, as a tool to deconstruct the narratives around ‘Progress’ in relation to precarious labour practices and technological development.

In September 2019 my dad was made redundant.
From a company he had worked at for 43 years.
It was a matter of circumstance. A product of ‘progress’.
An ‘inevitability’.

This is not a new story. It is one replayed again and again throughout history. Those who do not step away in the relentless pursuit of progress are considered regressive and against the inevitable order. We treat our objects, our tools, our machines like we treat people. Once they have lost their usefulness they are either housed in a museum or taken to landfill. Once their productivity enhancing capacity is made redundant, their worth, their ‘value’, is gone.

Technology perpetuates particular conditions and are reflective of society’s values. With each wave of technological progress, the same stories, reactions and resistances re-emerge, but in forms unique to their time. Stories are feedback looping, revolving hands on a fixed time piece. If we have a firmer grip on understanding history in order to reexamine its tangent narratives, it can be used as a tool to learn from and allow values which exist outside of ‘productive’ capitalist modes to ripple into the present moment.

Beyond the veil of innovation is an old story, this story must be challenged and the tools to hand co-opted to question the narrative we are told to follow. What happens when ‘older’ mediums are harnessed to tell the story of innovation – Can it open up conversations and space to question what is new? Of what is progressive? And of who is benefiting?

Today’s technology is tomorrow’s craft: Can storytelling and craft be utilized as a tool to deconstruct and challenge the story of progress?

Text written by Sophie Huckfield